15 Best Campgrounds in Olympic National Park

Kalaloch Campground at sunset in Olympic National Park

Are you planning a camping trip in Olympic National Park but are feeling overwhelmed by all the options? Are you trying to figure out how to pick the best campground for you?

Then, don’t miss this guide on the best campgrounds in Olympic National Park!

Olympic National Park has many incredible things to do, from bucket list hikes to stunning rainforest landscapes. This massive national park also has no shortage of places to stay.

Camping in Olympic National Park allows you to stay close to all the best hikes and top activities, save money, and immerse yourself in the epic temperate rainforests.

This post will give you an overview of the 15 best campgrounds in Olympic National Park, tips on reserving a campsite, free camping outside the park, and essential things to know before your trip.

Are you looking for more ideas for your trip to Olympic National Park? Don’t miss these posts!

This post may contain affiliate links, where I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. Read more in this disclosure policy.

Olympic National Park At-A-Glance

Before diving in, here are a few highlights to help you plan your trip:

  • Best Time to Visit: July to September is the best time to visit when all roads are open and rain is minimal. Higher elevation areas like Hurricane Ridge are typically only open from mid-June to October.
  • Where to Stay: The most conveniently located lodges in Olympic National Park are Lake Crescent Lodge and Kalaloch Lodge. If you want to stay outside the park, consider staying the Red Lion Hotel or the Woodland Inn.
  • How to Get There: The closest airport is in Seattle, located 2 to 3 hours away. Use Skyscanner to browse flights and find the best price.
  • How to Get Around: My favorite way to see Washington is by campervan. I had a fantastic experience renting a luxury campervan through Noma Vans on Outdoorsy. You can also easily get around by car. I recommend using Rentalcars.com to browse for deals.
  • Don’t Forget: Be sure to get an America the Beautiful National Park Pass ahead of time. This $80 pass is valid for 12 months and gets you into all 400+ national park sites (including all 3 Washington parks).

Olympic National Park Campsites Overview

The 15 campgrounds in Olympic National Park are managed mainly by the National Park Service. However, two campgrounds with more RV amenities are privately operated: Log Cabin RV Resort and Sol Duc Hot Springs RV Park.

All campgrounds that accept reservations can be booked via Recreation.gov except Log Cabin Resort, secured through Olympic National Park Lodges.

It’s also important to note that plenty of campgrounds exist in the national forests and communities surrounding Olympic National Park.

I’m covering those campground options separately at the end of this post!

Before diving into the details of each campground, here’s a quick overview of the 15 campgrounds available inside Olympic National Park.

CampgroundOpen DatesReserveSitesToiletsWaterDump StationRVs
Deer ParkJun-OctNo14PitNoNoNo
DosewallipsAll YearNo30PitNoNoNo
FairholmeApr-SepYes88FlushYesYesYes
Graves CreekAll YearNo30PitNoNoNo
Heart O’the HillsAll YearNo105FlushYesNoYes
HohAll YearYes72FlushYesNoYes
KalalochAll YearYes170FlushYesYesYes
Log CabinMay-SepYes38FlushYesYesYes
MoraAll YearYes94FlushYesYesYes
North ForkAll YearNo9PitNoNoNo
OzetteAll YearNo15PitYesNoYes
QueetsAll YearNo20PitNoNoNo
Sol DucMar-OctYes82FlushYesYesYes
South BeachMay-SepNo55FlushNoNoYes
StaircaseAll YearNo49FlushYesNoYes

How to Book the Best Campsites in Olympic National Park

Depending on the campground you choose, there are two different ways to make a reservation.

If you’re booking a site at Log Cabin Resort, you’ll need to call Olympic National Park Lodges at 888-896-3818 to book. Online booking is unavailable through the website. However, you can read more about the campground here.

For all other reservable campgrounds, you’ll book through Recreation.gov. Here are a couple of essential things to note for these campgrounds:

  • Reservations open on a rolling 6-month basis. For example, a campsite reservation for July 1, 2023, opens on January 1, 2023, at 7 AM pacific time.
  • Book sites at Kalaloch, Mora, Sol Duc Hot Springs, Fairholme, and Hoh Campground as soon as reservations open. These campgrounds are popular and will fill up quickly after reservations are released, particularly for peak season. For the best selection, create an account on Recreation.gov in advance and be ready to book at 7 AM PT on the day reservations open for your trip.
  • Pick your campsite ahead of time. On Recreation.gov, you book a specific campsite. Be prepared to secure the correct type of site for your set-up (tent-only or RV). I recommend picking out a few sites just in case your top choice is already booked.

Recreation.gov Reservation Tip
Campgrounds on Recreation.gov get booked quickly. When reservations are released, I recommend adding a campsite to your cart. You can hold a campsite in your cart for 15 minutes before it is released. During that 15 minutes, I go back and check if I can find a more desirable site. If I can, I’ll add that one to my cart. If not, I will book the one I’ve already added to my cart.

How do you get a first-come, first-served campsite at Olympic National Park?

The majority of the campgrounds in Olympic National Park are available on a first-come, first-served basis. These campgrounds include Deer Park, Dosewallips, Graves Creek, Heart O’ the Hills, North Fork, Ozette, Queets, South Beach, and Staircase Campgrounds.

On weekdays, many of these campgrounds do not fill. However, during the busy summer season, campgrounds can fill in the morning. 

Here’s my process for securing a first-come, first-served campsite in Olympic:

  1. Drive the full campground loop when you arrive. As you drive, note sites that look vacant and are interesting to you. Be sure to note if you’ll need a flatter site for an RV or camper or a site with a larger tent pad and proximity to the bathroom and neighbors.
  2. Return to the board at the front of the campground. Here you’ll find a board with numbered slots corresponding to the campsites. Check to see if the campsites you noted are already reserved. Double-check the dates on the cards in the slots, as they could be leftover from previous stays. I noticed the cards only got cleaned out about once a week.
  3. Fill out your card and complete your payment. Fill out the card and submit your payment for the campsite. The Olympic National Park campsites require you to fill out a credit card number on a piece of paper and insert it into a protected slot that only the NPS can unlock. Put your receipt stub in the slot for your campsite on the board.

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Should you rent a campervan to camp in Olympic National Park?

On my recent Washington road trip, I decided to rent a campervan when visiting Olympic National Park.

I highly recommend renting a campervan if you plan to stay at multiple campgrounds. You’ll avoid setting up and breaking down camp every day – it’s truly a great way to see the park!

I rented a campervan through Noma Vans on Outdoorsy and can’t say enough good things about their vans. They have showers and modern amenities and fit into any normal parking space.

With a campervan, you can save money by cooking your own meals and avoiding needing a rental car. I think there’s no better way to see Olympic National Park than by campervan!

Noma campervan in a campsite

What to Know For Camping at Olympic National Park

  • A camping reservation in Olympic National Park does not cover your park entry fee. I recommend purchasing the America the Beautiful National Park Pass before your trip. This pass gets you into every Washington national park, plus 400 more national park sites! Get your annual national park pass here for only $80.
  • There are only RV hookups at Log Cabin Resort and Sol Duc Hot Springs RV Parks. You’ll find campsites here with full hookups for electricity and water. 
  • Dump stations are only available at specific campgrounds. There are dump stations at Fairholme, Kalaloch, Log Cabin Resort, Mora, and Sol Duc Hot Springs.
  • Most campgrounds are open year-round. However, Deer Park, Fairholme, Log Cabin Resort, Sol Duc Hot Springs, and South Beach are seasonal campgrounds only open from late Spring to early Fall. 
  • Campsites for RVs 25+ feet in length are very limited. Before making a reservation, you’ll need to check each campground’s restrictions and lengths. I recommend booking at Log Cabin Resort or Sol Duc Hot Springs RV Park for those with Class A RVs.
  • Pets are allowed in campgrounds but are not permitted on hiking trails and cannot be left unattended. Therefore, if you plan to bring a pet, you will need someone to stay with them at the campsite during the day if you plan to hike. Read more about pets in Olympic National Park.
  • Cell service is limited in many areas of the park. Be sure to download your campground details or take a screenshot before arriving at the park.
  • Use the bear storage containers at your campsite to store food and scented items. Olympic National Park is home to black bears. Therefore, properly storing food and toiletries is crucial to avoid attracting bears to your campsite.

Looking for more tips on what to pack for your trip? Check out my guides on the best hiking gear, what to pack for a road trip, and essential camping gear for all my favorite gear picks and tips to make packing for your trip a breeze!

At A Glance: Best Places to Camp in Olympic National Park

Here are a few insights if you’re looking for a quick summary of the best campgrounds in Olympic National Park. Keep reading for all the details on each campground, including the best things to do near each campground!

  • Overall Best Campgrounds: Kalaloch, Mora, Sol Duc Hot Springs
  • Best RV Campgrounds: Log Cabin Resort, Kalaloch, Mora, Sol Duc Hot Springs
  • Best Oceanfront Campgrounds: Kalaloch, South Beach
  • Best Primitive Campgrounds: North Fork, Ozette, Queets
  • Best Hike-In Campground: Dosewallips
Sunset at Kalaloch Beach in Olympic National Park
View of Kalaloch Beach from the campground

Best Olympic National Park Campgrounds Inside the Park

This section overviews every campground in Olympic National Park, including information on the campground amenities and what’s nearby. After reading, you’ll know which campground is perfect for your trip!

Most campgrounds include picnic tables and fire pits as basic amenities. However, each campground differs in the availability of other amenities like showers, toilets, potable water, and RV hookups.

Deer Park Campground

  • Sites: 14
  • Reservations: No
  • Season: June to Mid-October
  • Toilets: Pit
  • Potable Water: No
  • RVs Allowed: No
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: No
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Deer Park Ranger Station, Rainshadow Trail

Deer Park Campground is one of the highest elevation campgrounds in Olympic National Park, sitting at more than 5,000 feet in elevation. But getting here requires navigating a steep gravel road into the Olympic mountain range. 

This campground is small and isolated, perfect for those looking for a peaceful camping trip, but less ideal for those looking to be close to top attractions in Olympic National Park. 

Those who make the journey are rewarded with incredible scenic views of the Strait of Juan De Fuca, Puget Sound, and the surrounding mountains. Deer Park is the only alpine campground in the park, making for a unique but remote stay.

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Dosewallips Campground

  • Sites: 30 (hike-in sites only)
  • Reservations: No
  • Season: Year Round
  • Toilets: Pit
  • Potable Water: No
  • RVs Allowed: No
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: No
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Dosewallips Ranger Station, Terrace Loop Trail, Dosewallips Falls

Dosewallips Campground is Olympic National Park’s only developed hike-in campground. Unlike backcountry campgrounds that require a wilderness permit, Dosewallips does not require a permit and offers pit toilets.

However, like backcountry camping, Dosewallips Campground is primitive without running water, and you must hike in with your gear. Since the road has washed out, you cannot drive to the campground and must walk 6.5 miles along Dosewallips Road.

Those who make the trek here are rewarded with a quiet, peaceful campground nestled along the Dosewallips River.

Boat launch area in Fairholme Campground in Olympic National Park
The boat launch at Fairholme Campground

Fairholme Campground

  • Sites: 88
  • Reservations: Yes
  • Season: Late April to Late September
  • Toilets: Flush
  • Potable Water: Yes
  • RVs Allowed: Yes, up to 21 feet
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Lake Crescent, Spruce Railroad Trail
  • Reserve a site at Fairholme Campground

Fairholme Campground is located along Lake Crescent’s shores, one of Olympic National Park’s top attractions. Due to its popular location and close proximity to hikes in Lake Crescent, Sol Duc, and Hurricane Ridge areas, Fairholme requires reservations in the summer months.

Campers can enjoy the plethora of hiking trails nearby, like the Spruce Railroad Trail, best used for hiking and biking. A boat launch is also located near the campground for those looking to tour Lake Crescent on the water or go fishing.

The campground is also a short distance from the Fairholme General Store along Highway 101, providing quick conveniences and kayak rentals for those staying here. 

Picnic table at Graves Creek Campground in Olympic National Park
Graves Creek Campground

Graves Creek Campground

  • Sites: 30
  • Reservations: No
  • Season: Year Round
  • Toilets: Pit
  • Potable Water: No
  • RVs Allowed: No
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: No
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: East Fork Quinault River Trail to Enchanted Valley, Pony Bridge

Graves Creek Campground is a popular campground for those heading into the backcountry to the Enchanted Valley. The small campground is located at the end of a gravel road, about 14 miles from the Quinault Rain Forest Ranger Station.

This campground is primitive, without running water, and only offers first-come, first-served campsites. However, the remote nature offers incredible hikes nearby, like the East Fork Quinault River Trail

Graves Creek is remote and requires slow driving into the forest. While it’s an excellent option for spending a night before heading into the backcountry, it’s a less desirable campground for those looking for easy access to Olympic National Park’s most popular activities.

Heart O'the Hills Campground in Olympic National Park
Heart O’the Hills Campground

Heart O’ the Hills Campground

  • Sites: 105
  • Reservations: No
  • Season: Year Round
  • Toilets: Flush
  • Potable Water: Yes
  • RVs Allowed: Yes, up to 35 feet
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: No
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Lake Angeles Trail, Heart O’ the Forest Trail, Lake Dawn

Heart O’the Hills Campground is the closest campground to Hurricane Ridge, located about 12 miles from the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center. This stunning alpine region is one of the most visited areas in the park. Staying here provides a massive advantage for catching sunrise or sunset over the Olympics.

While this first-come, first-served campground has more than 100 campsites, it fills quickly on summer weekends. While the campground is open year-round, winter months bring heavy snow in the higher elevation Hurricane Ridge area, requiring visitors to hike or snowshoe to campsites.

The Heart O’the Hills campsites are tucked away in the ancient trees, providing plenty of shade and privacy. If you’re looking for a great place to stay near Port Angeles and Hurricane Ridge, head to Heart O’the Hills Campground to claim a campsite.

Hoh Campground in Olympic National Park
Hoh Campground

Hoh Campground

  • Sites: 72
  • Reservations: Yes
  • Season: Year Round
  • Toilets: Flush
  • Potable Water: Yes
  • RVs Allowed: Yes, up to 35 feet
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: No
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center, Hall of Mosses Trail, Spruce Nature Trail, Hoh River Trail
  • Reserve a site at Hoh Campground 

Hoh Campground is one of the most popular campgrounds in the park, providing access to one of the park’s top regions: the Hoh Rain Forest. This impressive temperate rainforest draws crowds, and parking can fill up early. By staying at Hoh Campground, you avoid busy parking lots and can walk to all the main attractions in the area!

The best time to camp at Hoh Campground is in the summer when the forest is lush but drier. The rest of the year, Hoh Rain Forest is wet, getting more than 140 inches of rain annually. When staying here, you’ll feel immersed in Washington state’s great rainforest, surrounded by mosses and old-growth trees.

Only a short walk from the campground, you’ll find the trailheads for the three most popular trails in the Hoh Rainforest: Hall of Mosses, Spruce Nature Trail, and Hoh River Trail.

Kalaloch Campground

  • Sites: 170
  • Reservations: Yes
  • Season: Year Round
  • Toilets: Flush
  • Potable Water: Yes
  • RVs Allowed: Yes, up to 35 feet
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Kalaloch Beaches, Tree of Life, Kalaloch Creek Nature Trail, Kalaloch Lodge
  • Reserve a site at Kalaloch Campground
Campsite at Kalaloch Campground in Olympic National Park
Kalaloch Campground

Kalaloch is my favorite campground in Olympic National Park, providing epic sunset views. The campground is perched upon a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Many of the best sites have direct oceanfront views.

However, this oceanfront campground does not provide as much privacy as the forested campgrounds in other parts of the park. But suppose you’re looking for a central location for exploring the southern coast in Olympic National Park. In that case, you can’t beat Kalaloch Campground.

This campground is incredibly popular, so its 170 campsites fill up quickly for the summer. They must be reserved six months ahead of time when reservations are released.

Log Cabin Resort & RV Park

  • Sites: 38
  • Reservations: Yes
  • Season: Mid-May to Late September
  • Toilets: Flush
  • Potable Water: Yes
  • RVs Allowed: Yes, up to 35 feet
  • Hookups: Yes
  • Dump Station: Yes
  • Showers: Yes
  • What’s Nearby: Lake Crescent, Spruce Railroad Nature Trail
  • Read more about Log Cabin Resort

Log Cabin Resort RV Park is a privately managed campground and lodge along the shores of Lake Crescent. Unlike other campgrounds, it is not managed by the National Park Service, and reservations must be made directly through the lodging company by phone.

You have impressive views of the Olympic Mountains behind Lake Crescent from the campground, including Mount Storm King.

It is the only campground in Olympic National Park that provides showers and laundry and has campsites with full hookups. While the campsites don’t provide privacy, you benefit from the amenities of the Log Cabin Resort lodge, restaurant, gift shop, and on-site general store. 

You can’t beat the conveniences of this campground when traveling in an RV or campervan. However, I wouldn’t stay here if I was tent camping.

Mora Campground

  • Sites: 94
  • Reservations: Yes
  • Season: Year Round
  • Toilets: Flush
  • Potable Water: Yes
  • RVs Allowed: Yes, up to 35 feet
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Rialto Beach, Mora Ranger Station, Slough Trail
  • Reserve a site at Mora Campground

Mora Campground is another popular campground in the coastal region of Olympic National Park. However, this campground near the La Push beaches is not oceanfront. Instead, it’s tucked away in a coastal forest providing more private campsites.

The campsite sites are along the Quillayute River, with some campsites having riverfront views. You’re a short drive to several famous beaches, including Rialto Beach, First Beach, and  Second Beach, providing incredible sunset views.

North Fork Campground in Olympic National Park
North Fork Campground

North Fork Campground

  • Sites: 9
  • Reservations: No
  • Season: Year Round
  • Toilets: Pit
  • Potable Water: No
  • RVs Allowed: No
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: No
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: North Fork Quinault River

North Fork Campground is the smallest campground in Olympic National Park, providing only nine first-come, first-served campsites. The campsites here are primitive, without running water or drinking water.

Similar to Graves Creek Campground, getting to North Fork requires a drive on an unpaved road into a remote location. The isolated nature of this campground and its temperate rainforest environment make for a uniquely private and peaceful camping experience.

However, I don’t recommend staying here to explore the most popular park attractions as the campground is further away.

Ozette Campground

  • Sites: 15
  • Reservations: No
  • Season: Year Round
  • Toilets: Pit
  • Potable Water: Yes
  • RVs Allowed: Yes, up to 21 feet
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: No
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Ozette Ranger Station, Ozette Triangle Loop Trail

Ozette Campground is one of the only campgrounds in the northwestern part of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. It’s tucked away along the northern edge of Lake Ozette and offers 15 first-come, first-served campsites, some with lake views!

This campground is excellent for those looking to hike the Ozette Triangle Loop Trail, sometimes called the Cape Alava Loop. The trail guides you through wetlands, forests, and rugged shorelines. With such varied terrains, this hike is an excellent sampler of all that Olympic National Park’s coastal region offers. 

Ozette Campground is also popular among fishermen and those looking to spend time on Lake Ozette.

Read More: 21 Best Hikes in Olympic

Queets Campground Olympic National Park
Queets Campground

Queets Campground

  • Sites: 20
  • Reservations: No
  • Season: Year Round
  • Toilets: Pit
  • Potable Water: No
  • RVs Allowed: No
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: No
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Queets Ranger Station, Queets River Trail, Sam’s River Loop Trail

Queets Campground is a primitive, small campground nestled along the Queets River between Quinault Rain Forest and Hoh Rain Forest in the western part of Olympic National Park.

Reaching this campground requires navigating Upper Queets River Road, a small access road. Campsites are private, shaded by the thick mosses and ferns of the temperate rainforest.

While it’s not as conveniently located as other campgrounds, Queets Campground can provide a peaceful and quiet camping experience in Olympic National Park.

Sol Duc Hot Springs RV Park & Campground

  • Sites: 82
  • Reservations: Yes
  • Season: Mid-March to Late October
  • Toilets: Flush
  • Potable Water: Yes
  • RVs Allowed: Yes, up to 35 feet
  • Hookups: Yes
  • Dump Station: Yes
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Lover’s Lane, Sol Duc Falls, Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort
  • Reserve a site at Sol Duc Hot Springs Campground

Sol Duc Hot Springs RV Park & Campground is another privately operated campground in Olympic National Park. However, unlike Log Cabin Resort, you can make reservations via Recreation.gov.

This campground is tucked away in the Sol Duc Rainforest along the Sol Duc River. Campsites here cater to tent and RV campers, with some sites having full RV hookups.

Nearby, you can explore famous sites like Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort, where you can soak in rejuvenating mineral hot spring pools. If you’re interested in hiking, you can make the short drive to the Sol Duc Falls Trail or hike there from the campground via the Lover’s Lane loop!

Sol Duc Campground is also close enough to Lake Crescent to make an easy day trip to explore this area too!

South Beach Campground along the coast in Olympic National Park
South Beach Campground

South Beach Campground

  • Sites: 55
  • Reservations: No
  • Season: Mid-May to Late Sept
  • Toilets: Flush
  • Potable Water: No
  • RVs Allowed: Yes, up to 35 feet
  • Hookups: No
  • Dump Station: No
  • Showers: No
  • What’s Nearby: Kalaloch Beaches, Kalaloch Creek Nature Trail, Kalaloch Lodge

South Beach Campground is one of the larger first-come, first-served campgrounds in Olympic National Park. It is located just down the road from Kalaloch Campground and provides close access to Kalaloch Beach 1’s overlook and trail.

You have stunning views of the Pacific Ocean from the campground on the bluff. Like Kalaloch Campground, South Beach Campground has beautiful sunsets easily seen from the campground.

While there are flush toilets here, there’s no drinking water. You’ll need to bring your water. Thankfully, the general store and Kalaloch Lodge are only a short drive away.

Staircase Campground

  • Sites: 49
  • Reservations: No
  • Season: Year Round
  • Hookups: No
  • Toilets: Flush
  • Showers: No
  • Potable Water: Yes
  • Dump Station: No
  • RVs Allowed: 35 feet
  • What’s Nearby: Staircase Ranger Station, Staircase Rapids Loop, Shady Lane Trail

Staircase Campground is located in one less visited part of Olympic National Park: The Staircase. You’ll need to drive through Olympic National Forest on unpaved roads to get here. 

However, those who choose to camp here are rewarded with lush campsites with plenty of tree cover and few crowds, even in summer. The old-growth forest is filled with fir trees, and the flowing river nearby makes for the best camping experience.

From the campground, you can walk to several impressive hiking trails, including Staircase Rapids Loop, which follows the Skokomish River through an old-growth forest. If you want to explore off-the-beaten-path in Olympic National Park, don’t miss staying in the Staircase region!

Backpacker in the mountains in Olympic National Park
Source: National Park Service

Backpacking Olympic National Park

If you genuinely want to get off the grid, backcountry camping in Olympic National Park is a great option! Many backcountry campsites in the Olympics explore epic mountains, alpine lakes, ocean shorelines, and rainforests.

Backcountry camping requires a wilderness permit reserved via Recreation.gov up to six months in advance. As of 2021, walk-up permits are no longer available, and you must make all reservations online.

Many popular areas operate on a quota basis and can fill up six months in advance when reservations are released!

If you’re interested in backcountry camping in Olympic National Park, read more about the wilderness permit system here.

There’s no shortage of incredible backpacking trails in Olympic National Park. Here are a few top-rated backcountry campgrounds:

  • Enchanted Valley: This is one of the most popular backing routes in the park, home to a historic backcountry lodge. The hike to stay at this campground is around 26 miles round trip. You’ll follow the trail from the Graves Creek Trailhead through an old-growth temperate rainforest out to Enchanted Valley. The valley features backcountry campsites with epic waterfall views.
  • Shi Shi Beach: If you’re looking for a picturesque day hike and the perfect place to stay on the beach, don’t miss camping at Shi Shi Beach! This route is 8 miles round trip out to the Point of Arches. You’ll follow a boardwalk path for the first few miles before descending to the beach and continuing along the Pacific Ocean. You’ll also need a Makah Recreation Permit and your Olympic National Park wilderness permit to stay here.
  • Hole-in-the-Wall: This beautiful beachfront hike to a coastal campsite area is a must for those looking for an easy one-night backpacking trip. The trail starts at the Rialto Beach parking area and follows the Pacific Ocean down to Hole-in-the-Wall. You’ll have incredible views of the towering sea stacks and driftwood beach from the campsite.
  • Mt. Tom Creek: The Hoh River Trail is a popular backpacking trail. The Mt. Tom Creek campsite is one of the best campgrounds along the route for beginner backpackers. You’ll start at the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center before following the Hoh River 3 miles to the campground. If you’re looking to venture further, you can opt to stay at Five Mile Island instead!
  • Sol Duc Falls: This backcountry campsite is barely a mile from the Sol Duc Falls trailhead, just past the scenic waterfall. The ultra-short hike makes this the best beginner backpacking trail in the park. You’ll camp in the dense temperate rainforest, which is the starting point for the most popular backpacking trail in the park – the High Divide / Seven Basins Loop.
Sunset at Hole-in-the-Wall at Rialto Beach in Olympic National Park
Hole-in-the-Wall near Rialto Beach

Free, Dispersed Camping Near Olympic National Park

Olympic National Forest surrounds Olympic National Park. During your trip, you’ll drive in and out of the national park and forest.

While dispersed camping is not allowed in Olympic National Park, you can dispersed camp in Olympic National Forest.

Dispersed camping is free and simply means you’ll pull up at the campsite of your choice to spend the night! Often you won’t have amenities like running water or restrooms found in most established campgrounds.

You can read more about dispersed camping in Olympic National Forest here. While free camping here, you will need a Discover Pass to cover your park admission.

Other Campgrounds Near Olympic National Park

In addition to free, dispersed camping, campgrounds are in Olympic National Forest and nearby state parks.

If you’re looking for campgrounds outside the park instead, here are a few of the best National Forest Service campgrounds and state park campgrounds:

  • Coho Campground in Olympic National Forest offers 46 reservable campsites and can accommodate RVs (near Lake Quinault area)
  • Willaby Campground in Olympic National Forest offers 19 reservable, lakefront campsites and can accommodate RVs (on Lake Quinault)
  • Hamma Hamma Campground in Olympic National Forest offers 15 first-come, first-served campgrounds and can accommodate small RVs up to 21 feet (near the Staircase area)
  • Bogachiel State Park Campground offers 32 reservable campsites, can accommodate a limited number of RVs, and offers a few sites with water and electric hookups (near La Push and Hoh Rain Forest)
  • Salt Creek Recreation Area Campground offers 92 campsites, a mix of reservable and first-come, first-served, and can accommodate RVs (near Lake Crescent)

If you’re looking for a campground with more RV-friendly amenities like hookups and showers, check out these private campgrounds near Olympic National Park:

Lake Crescent Lodge and lake in Olympic National Park
Lake Crescent Lodge

Best Places to Stay in Olympic National Park When Campgrounds are Booked

If you find reservable campgrounds in Olympic National Park are already booked and you’d rather stay in a hotel, consider booking one of these spots instead.

Staying at one of the park’s lodges reduces driving time to popular attractions. However, staying outside will be more budget-friendly and offer more availability.

These are the best lodges inside Olympic National Park:

These are the best hotels near Olympic National Park:

Frequently Asked Questions About Olympic National Park Camping

How many campsites are in Olympic National Park?

There are 871 campsites in Olympic National Park spread across 15 campgrounds. Of those, 544 campsites are reservable up to six months in advance. The remaining 327 campsites operate on a first-come, first-served basis. These campsites do not include backcountry sites that require a wilderness permit to access.

Do you have to reserve campsites in Olympic National Park?

Six out of the 15 campgrounds in Olympic National Park accept reservations. These campgrounds include Fairholme, Hoh, Kalaloch, Log Cabin Resort, Mora, and Sol Duc Hot Springs. Staying here requires an advanced reservation. However, you can stay at the nine first-come, first-served campgrounds without reservation.

Suppose you are traveling with an RV over 21 feet. In that case, I highly recommend booking a campground in advance as campsites that accommodate larger RVs are limited.

Do campgrounds in Olympic National Park fill up?

Popular campgrounds in Olympic National Park often fill up in advance as reservations are released six months out. In addition, first-come, first-served campgrounds like Heart O’the Hills Campground can also fill up in the morning on busy summer weekends. The best way to secure a campsite is to make a reservation six months in advance.

Can you camp anywhere in the Olympic National Park?

Inside Olympic National Park, you must camp in campgrounds. Boondocking, dispersed camping, or camping along the side of the road is not allowed. If you want to camp in the backcountry, you’ll need a wilderness permit. However, outside the park in Olympic National Forest, dispersed camping is allowed.

Can I sleep in my car at Olympic National Park?

You can only sleep in your vehicle in Olympic National Park inside a designated campground. Sleeping in your car is not allowed in parking lots or along the side of the road. However, boondocking and sleeping in your car are allowed in the nearby Olympic National Forest.

Are there showers in Olympic National Park?

The only campground in Olympic National Park that offers showers is Log Cabin Resort RV Park. This privately operated campground along Lake Crescent provides showers, laundry, and full RV hookups. However, this campground is not ideal for tent campers and is geared towards RVs and campervans.

Final Thoughts on the Best Campground in Olympic National Park

Camping in Olympic National Park is the perfect way to immerse yourself in this diverse national park landscape.

From campgrounds nestled in the unique temperate rainforests to oceanfront campsites, you’ll have a wide selection of campgrounds when looking for a place to stay.

Suppose you only want to pick a few campgrounds to visit during your trip. In that case, I recommend Kalaloch Campground, Hoh Campground, Fairholme Campground, and Heart O’the Hills Campground!

These are the 15 best campgrounds in Olympic National Park:

  1. Deer Park Campground
  2. Dosewallips Campground
  3. Fairholme Campground
  4. Graves Creek Campground
  5. Heart O’the Hills Campground
  6. Hoh Campground
  7. Kalaloch Campground
  8. Log Cabin Resort RV Park
  9. Mora Campground
  10. North Fork Campground
  11. Ozette Campground
  12. Queets Campground
  13. Sol Duc Hot Springs RV Park
  14. South Beach Campground
  15. Staircase Campground

Don’t miss these posts if you’re looking for more Olympic National Park inspiration!

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