19 Best Hikes in Glacier National Park You Need to Explore

Ptarmigan Tunnel is one of the most rewarding Glacier National Park day hikes

Glacier National Park has over 700 miles of hiking trails and over 50 day hikes. So how do you pick which ones to do? This guide covers the 19 best hikes in Glacier National Park. You’ll discover all the can’t-miss sights and essential trails, from icy glacier to stunning wildlife.

I’ve broken Glacier National Park’s best hikes up into several sections:

  • Easy hikes in Glacier National Park – best for families or seniors
  • Hikes in West Glacier
  • Hikes along Going-to-the-Sun Road
  • Hikes in Many Glacier
  • Hikes in Two Medicine

No matter where you go in Glacier National Park, this guide has you covered. Keep reading for more information on the best time to hike in Glacier National Park, what gear you need, and where to stay near the trails! Without further ado, here’s the 19 best hikes in Glacier National Park.

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Best Hikes in Glacier National Park pinterest pin

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Planning a trip to Glacier National Park? Don’t miss these helpful posts!

Overview of Glacier National Park Best Hikes

Glacier National Park has many regions with Going-to-the-Sun Road connecting the park. The best day hikes are found in West Glacier, Many Glacier, and Two Medicine, as well as along Going-to-the-Sun Road.
Depending on how much time you have to spend in Glacier, you’ll likely only be able to hike in a few of the park’s regions.

If you only have 3 days in Glacier National Park, I recommend spending your time hiking along Going-to-the-Sun Road and in Many Glacier.

If you have a week in Glacier National Park, I recommend exploring all the park’s regions to discover some hidden gems.

The map below allows you to find the trails close to where you’re staying or will be visiting. To dig a little deeper, just zoom in and click on the icons to discover the trail!

Best Time to Go Hiking in Glacier National Park

Hiking in Glacier National Park will depend on the weather. The park is snow covered from October to April, sometimes even as late as June. From late June to mid September the park opens all its roads and trails for visitors to enjoy.

The best time to visit Glacier National Park is between early July and early September. This will ensure all trails are open and snow free.

But keep in mind, because the park has such a narrow tourism season, the park will be crowded. The best way to beat the crowds at Glacier is to start your day early.

Want to know more about planning a trip to Glacier? Check out this Ultimate Guide on Glacier National Park

Where to Stay Near the Best Hikes in Glacier National Park

There are multiple places to stay near Glacier National Park’s hiking regions. To avoid crowds, it’s important to get an early start. The best way to do that is by staying close to the trailheads.

Many Glacier Hotel in Glacier National Park

These are the best places to stay near the Glacier National Park hiking trails:

West Glacier

Going-to-the-Sun Road & St. Mary

Many Glacier

To book a stay at one of the in-demand park lodges, aim to book a year in advance.

To stay at an in park campground, aim to make reservations 6 months out. Glacier National Park also has many first-come, first-served campgrounds. Use the Glacier National Park Campground Status Tracker to track historical fill times and find a spot.

Tents in a campsite in Glacier National Park

Gear You Need for the Best Hikes Glacier National Park

  • Layers
    Pack moisture-wicking hiking shirts and warm fleece layers to keep you comfortable all day.
  • Rain Jacket
    In the summer, it rains 17 days per month. While it might just be a light, quick shower, it’s best to be prepared and always carry a rain jacket or poncho.
  • Hiking Boots
    You’ll want sturdy, comfortable hiking boots with solid traction. Don’t forget to break in your shoes before bringing them to Glacier!
  • Merino Wool Socks
    Always opt for merino wool socks. They might be a bit expensive, but they will last a long time, keep your feet dry, and protect you from blisters.
  • Hiking Backpack and the 10 Essentials
    It’s important to carry safety gear every time you hike. Be sure to pack the 10 hiking essentials and bring a hiking backpack with plenty of room for water and extra gear.
  • Sun Hat and Sunscreen
    Many trails are unshaded, so it’s important to protect yourself from the sun. Sunscreen is obviously essential, but a sun hat will go a long way towards protecting you from sunburn too.
  • Binoculars
    Don’t miss any of Glacier’s wildlife – pack binoculars! They don’t have to be fancy, just any pair that will help you feel close to the creatures without actually having to be close.
  • Bear spray
    Bear Spray is an essential safety item for hiking in Glacier National Park. You can’t take it on planes, even in your checked baggage, so I recommend renting it at the airport if you’ll be flying.
A hiker walks along the Highline Trail in Glacier National Park.

Best Easy Hikes in Glacier National Park

These trails are perfect for families or those looking for a scenic stroll. All 3 of these easy hikes are short, sweet, and a great way to see the highlights of Glacier National Park.

Baring Falls

Baring Falls hike in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 0.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 250 feet
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-back
  • Length of Time: 30 minutes
  • Trailhead: Sunrift Gorge Pullout
  • Discover more on AllTrails

Baring Falls is one of the most accessible waterfalls in the park. It’s around a quarter-mile off Going-to-the-Sun Road, but is often overshadowed by nearby St. Mary and Virginia Falls. Baring Falls is less crowded, but just as spectacular.

While the official trailhead for this hike is Sunrift Gorge, you can also start the hike from Sun Point. This area has a larger parking lot than the Sunrift Gorge pullout, increasing your likelihood of finding a spot.

Grinnell Lake

Grinnell Lake hike in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 6.8 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 60 feet
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 3 hours
  • Trailhead: Many Glacier Hotel
  • Discover more on AllTrails

Grinnell Lake is one of the most popular easy trails in the park. On this long, but easy trail you’ll pass not one, not two, but three of Glacier’s lakes. The trail starts at the Many Glacier Hotel before winding along Swiftcurrent Lake and Lake Josephine. After reaching Grinnell Lake, you’ll be rewarded with crystal blue waters formed from glacier runoff.

You can even bring an inflatable kayak to paddle around the lake! On your way back to the Many Glacier Lodge, you can loop around Swiftcurrent Lake for even more alpine lake views.

Redrock Falls

Redrock Falls in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 3.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 100 feet
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 1.5 hours
  • Trailhead: Swiftcurrent Trailhead
  • Discover more on AllTrails

While not as accessible as Baring Falls, the trail to Redrock Falls is even more scenic. This trail starts near the Swiftcurrent Motor Inn and passes Fishercap Lake and Redrock Lake on the way to the falls.

This is one of the best trails in the park to spot moose. Take the short walk from the trail down to the water of both lakes to find baby and mama moose feeding in the water. Don’t forget to bring your binoculars for a closer look!

Best Hikes in West Glacier National Park

West Glacier is the closest part of the park to Kalispell, the most common airport for visitors to Glacier National Park. These hikes are best suited for days spent on the western part of the park.

McDonald Creek

McDonald Creek in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 5.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 280 feet
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 2 hours
  • Trailhead: Johns Lake Trailhead
  • Discover more on AllTrails

The Lake McDonald area is flatter and more tranquil than other parts of the park. The trail along McDonald Creek provides a peaceful escape from some of the more crowded trails in the park. McDonald Creek is a great trail to hike in the offseason, when most trails are closed due to snow. Winter hikers can walk along the frozen-over creek and explore off the beaten path.

Trail of the Cedars

  • Distance: 1.4 miles
  • Elevation Gain: None
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Type of Trail: Loop
  • Length of Time: 30 minutes
  • Trailhead: Avalanche Creek Picnic Area
  • Discover more on AllTrails

Trail of the Cedars is one of the few handicap accessible trails in the park. Starting across the street from the Avalanche Creek Picnic Area, you’ll walk along a boardwalk path through towering trees. This short trail provides a glimpse into the historic forests of Glacier National Park. Since it’s boardwalked, it’s one of the best trails for strollers or wheelchairs.

Avalanche Lake

Avalanche Lake hike in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 4.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 500 feet
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-back
  • Length of Time: 2.5 hours
  • Trailhead: Avalanche Creek Picnic Area
  • Discover more on AllTrails

The first part of the trail to Avalanche Lake follows the Trail of the Cedars. Once you make it onto the Avalanche Creek trail, crowds will decrease.

The trail takes you through a forest out to Avalanche Lake. This area of the park is some of the oldest growth in the park, left untouched by recent forest fires. If you have some extra energy, proceed to the far side of the lake for a different vantage point.

Just like other areas of the park, get to the parking lot at Avalanche Picnic Area early. These parking spots will fill up by 9am.

Best Hikes Along Going-to-the-Sun Road

Going-to-the-Sun Road connects the West Glacier and St. Mary region of the park. Some of the most popular trails in the park start along this scenic drive. Don’t miss the must-see hikes in the middle of the park!

Planning a trip to Glacier National Park? Download this guide to Going-to-the-Sun Road to discover all the best stops along Glacier’s famous scenic drive!

Highline Trail

Highline Trail hike in Glacier National Park

This one-way trail is often referred to as a sampler of Glacier National Park. With breathtaking vantage points, this trip is a must-do Glacier National Park day hike.

Start your hike at the trailhead across the street from the Logan Pass Visitor Center. You’ll navigate along the rocky cliffside before the trail opens up into grassy terrain. Keep your eyes peeled for mountain goats and marmots on this part of the trail.

Since this is a one-way hike, you’ll need transportation from The Loop back to your vehicle at Logan Pass Visitor Center. You can take the free park shuttle, arrange for someone else in your group to pick you up at the loop, or park one car at each end of the hike.

Want to know more about hiking the Highline Trail? Check out this post that covers all the details and logistics on hiking The Highline Trail.

Grinnell Glacier Overlook (The Garden Wall)

View from Garden Wall Grinnell Glacier Overlook in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 1.8 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 900 feet
  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 1 hour
  • Trailhead: Along the Highline Trail (Optional add on to the Highline Trail hike)
  • Read more about the Garden Wall here

Grinnell Glacier Overlook, commonly referred to as The Garden Wall, is a side trip off the Highline Trail. This super-strenuous, 1-mile, straight-uphill trek is a must-do addition. Will you be out of breath and questioning yourself the whole haul up the mountainside? Yes. Is it worth it? 110%.

The Garden Wall takes you up the side of the mountain range to overlook Grinnell Glacier. As you stand to overlook the turquoise waters, you’re also standing atop the Continental Divide.

Hidden Lake Overlook

Hidden Lake Overlook hike in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 2.8 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 460 feet
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Type of trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 1 hour
  • Trailhead: Logan Pass Visitor Center
  • Discover more on AllTrails

This out-and-back trail is routinely rated as one of the top hikes in Glacier National Park. It passes through grassy meadows and ends at a vantage point overlooking Hidden Lake.

The hike starts along a paved path behind the Logan Pass Visitor Center before changing to a boardwalk path and eventually a dirt trail. As you proceed through the open and exposed meadows, keep an eye out for mountain goats. Bighorn sheep, marmots, and bears also frequent these areas. Expect heavy crowds on this trail as it’s one of the most popular hikes in the park.

If you have some extra energy, proceed all the way down to the shores of the lake. You descend 780 feet to the lakeshore, but you’ll have to climb that same distance back out.

Siyeh Pass

Siyeh Pass in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 4.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 2,240 feet
  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Type of Trail: One Way
  • Length of Time: 5 hours
  • Trailhead: Piegan Pass Trailhead
  • Discover more on AllTrails

The Siyeh Pass Trail starts and ends along Going-to-the-Sun Road, at Piegan Pass or Sunrift Gorge. You’ll traverse beautiful alpine meadows with stunning mountain views on this trail. It’s a great alternative to the Highline Trail for those that want to avoid crowds.

Like the Highline Trail, you’ll need to arrange transportation as this is a one way hike. You can either take the park shuttle or park your cars at each end of the trail.

St. Mary and Virginia Falls

St. Mary Falls in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 3.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 285 feet
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Type of trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 1.5 hours
  • Trailhead: St. Mary Falls Trailhead
  • Discover more on AllTrails

This trail takes you to 2 well-known waterfalls. You’ll follow a steep trail down to St. Mary Lake. It’s the perfect place to spot quietly feeding deer and other wildlife. You’ll arrive at St. Mary Falls first. Some people even choose to take a dip in the chilly water here!

Another 0.8 miles uphill from St. Mary Falls is Virginia Falls. This waterfall is tall and impressive, one of the best waterfalls in the park.

Best Hiking Trails in Many Glacier

Many Glacier is one of the best hiking regions in Glacier National Park. You’ll find classic trails like Grinnell Glacier and Iceberg Lake here. If you are coming to Glacier National Park to hike, this is the best place for you to explore.

Apikuni Falls

Apikuni Falls hike in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 2 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 700 feet
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 1 hour
  • Trailhead: Apikuni Parking Area
  • Discover more on AllTrails

This waterfall is an excellent hike in the Many Glacier area. Apikuni Falls cascades down over two tiers into a series of smaller cascades. The trail starts at the Apukuni Falls trailhead along the road into Many Glacier. The hike is a bit of a climb up to the waterfall, but the difficulty is well worth it!

If you’re spending most of your time in the Many Glacier area, this is a great option for a hike to get your waterfall fix.

Cracker Lake

Cracker Lake hike in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 12.8 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 1,400 feet
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 6 hours
  • Trailhead: Many Glacier Hotel
  • Discover more on AllTrails

Cracker Lake is a sight to behold. From the clear, icy blue water to the beautiful alpine meadows and mountains, this hike has it all. It’s challenging, with plenty of switchbacks and elevation gain, but you’re rewarded with some of the bluest waters in the park.

This trail is renowned for bear sightings, as it is less crowded than other hikes in the area like Grinnell Glacier. This is a great hike for those who’ve been to Glacier National Park before and are looking for new trails to explore.

Grinnell Glacier Viewpoint

Grinnell Glacier Viewpoint hike in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 10.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 1,600 feet
  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 5.5 hours
  • Trailhead: Many Glacier Hotel
  • Discover more on AllTrails

This hike should be on your bucket list. The viewpoint at the top of this trail holds the bluest waters I’ve ever seen. The Grinnell Glacier hike starts at the Many Glacier Hotel passing 3 lakes on the way up. At the final viewpoint, you’re standing in front of several glaciers, including Grinnell Glacier. This is the best hike in the park to see glaciers up close.

If you prefer to cut distance off your hike, the Glacier Park Boat Company runs a tour across the lakes. You’ll disembark at the Lake Josephine dock, saving you 1.7 miles each way. Although be aware, you don’t cut off any of the elevation gain.

Much of this trail is unshaded, so starting in the morning will keep you from climbing to the viewpoint in the blazing sun. But prepare for a warm hike in the afternoon sun on the way back down.

Read More: Glacier National Park 3-Day Itinerary

Iceberg Lake

Iceberg Lake in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 9.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 1,200 feet
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 5 hours
  • Trailhead: Iceberg Ptarmigan Trailhead
  • Discover more on AllTrails

In a park filled with crystal blue waters, this alpine lake is one of the best. Iceberg Lake’s teal waters often have icebergs (as the name implies) floating in the water, even in the summer.

The trail starts behind the Swiftcurrent Motor Inn and shares the first 2.7 miles with the Ptarmigan Tunnel trail. As you proceed through this first section, be on the lookout for bears, particularly in September. Carry bear spray in an easily accessible location as a bear encounter is likely. Occasionally, bear activity may close this trail, so check trail status before you go.

Continue straight at the split from the Ptarmigan Tunnel trail, just after Ptarmigan Falls. Once you reach Iceberg Lake, walk around to find your own unique vantage point away from the crowds and eat a snack.

Ptarmigan Lake & Tunnel

Ptarmigan Tunnel is one of the most rewarding Glacier National Park day hikes
  • Distance: 10.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 2,300 feet
  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 6 hours
  • Trailhead: Iceberg Ptarmigan Trailhead
  • Discover more on AllTrails

The Ptarmigan Tunnel is a 250-foot tunnel built in the 1930s. It passes through the Ptarmigan Wall that separates Many Glacier Valley and Belly River Valley. The tunnel doors are closed in the off-season, typically only open from late July to September.

The first 2.7 miles of this trail is shared with the Iceberg Lake trail. Popular among hikers, it’s also a hotspot for grizzly bears. Just after you reach Ptarmigan Falls, the trail splits for hikers going to Iceberg Lake. After the split, the trail to Ptarmigan Lake & Tunnel will be much less crowded.

The final climb up to the tunnel is daunting, covering 500 feet in about two-thirds of a mile. But you’re rewarded with amazing views. Walk through the tunnel to see views of the Belly River Valley before returning back down through the Many Glacier Valley.

Optional Iceberg Lake and Ptarmigan Tunnel Loop
If you’re interested in a longer hike, combine the hikes to Iceberg Lake and Ptarmigan Tunnel. Make the 2.7-mile trek to Ptarmigan Falls, then hike out to Iceberg Lake, before making the trek up to Ptarmigan Tunnel. This combined hike is roughly 14.8 miles and 2,800 feet elevation.

Swiftcurrent Pass

Swiftcurrent Pass hike in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 13.6 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 2,300 feet
  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 9 hours
  • Trailhead: Swiftcurrent Trailhead
  • Discover more on AllTrails

The Swiftcurrent Pass Trail is tough. If you’re looking for an incredibly challenging and rewarding hike, this is the one for you. The trail starts near Swiftcurrent Motor Inn and follows the same path out to Redrock Falls. After the waterfall, the trail climbs up thousands of feet, giving you some of the best views in the park.

A side trail takes you to the Swiftcurrent Fire Lookout, the highest maintained trail in the park. Swiftcurrent Pass is only for advanced hikers in great shape.

Read More: Glacier National Park 7-Day Itinerary

Best Hiking Trails in Two Medicine

Two Medicine is less crowded than other parts of the park due to its location. To get here, you’ll need to drive about 1 hour south of St. Mary. But you’re rewarded with more solitude and some of Glacier’s best sunrise views here.

Pitamakan-Dawson Loop

Pitamakan Pass and Dawson Pass in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 17.2 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 3,641 feet
  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Type of Trail: Loop
  • Length of Time: 9.5 hours
  • Trailhead: Two Medicine Lake
  • Discover more on AllTrails

If you’re a return visitor to Glacier National Park with plenty of hiking experience, this trail is the perfect challenge. As the longest day hike in the park, the Pitamakan-Dawson Loop is remote and crowd free.
The trail takes you in a loop through lakes, alpine meadows, avalanche chutes, and mountain peaks. You’ll cover both Pitamakan Pass and Dawson Pass on this trail. The incredible views and lack of people make this a bucket list worthy hike for avid hikers.

To shorten the hike a bit, you can choose to take a one way boat tour across Two Medicine Lake, starting your hike from the west end of the lake instead.

Paradise Point

Paradise Point in Glacier National Park
  • Distance: 1.4 miles
  • Elevation Gain: 160 feet
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Type of Trail: Out-and-Back
  • Length of Time: 30 minutes
  • Trailhead: Two Medicine Lake
  • Discover more on AllTrails

Two Medicine is known for more strenuous trails, like the Pitamakan-Dawson loop above. But Paradise Point provides a great opportunity to explore Two Medicine without as much exertion.

The trail starts at the Two Medicine Lake parking lot and takes you around the side of the lake. You may even spot some beavers! This hike is beautiful at sunrise when the surrounding mountains are reflected in the still lake.

Planning a trip to Glacier National Park? Download this guide to Going-to-the-Sun Road to discover all the best stops along Glacier’s famous scenic drive!

Essential Information for the Glacier National Park Best Hikes

  • Arrive at the trailhead early. For popular trails, plan to start your hike around 8 AM to guarantee you find a parking spot and avoid crowds.
  • Most trails can only be hiked from June to September. Going-to-the-Sun Road around Logan Pass is closed Fall through Spring and many trails are closed due to snowfall. For historical Going-to-the-Sun Road opening and closing dates, check out this link on the Glacier website.
  • Always check trail status before hiking in Glacier National Park. For the latest updates, refer to the Glacier National Park website.
  • Glacier National Park requires visitors to purchase a pass to enter the park. If you plan to visit more than one national park in a year, the America the Beautiful pass is a great investment. For only $80, you get unlimited access to any national park for a full year!
  • Keep your distance from wildlife. While animals are fun to photograph and look at (don’t forget your binoculars!), be sure to keep your distance. You should stay at least 100 yards away from bears and wolves and at least 25 yards away from all other wildlife.

Frequently Asked Questions About the Best Hikes in Glacier National Park

What is the best hike in Glacier National Park?

The best hike in Glacier National Park is the Highline Trail, although this is subjective. On the Highline Trail you’ll see it all: wildlife, mountain views, alpine meadows, rustic cabins, and a taste of the backcountry of Glacier.

What should you not miss at Glacier National Park?

The best thing to do in Glacier National Park is hike. Don’t miss these best hikes in Glacier National Park: Highline Trail, Grinnell Glacier Overlook, Iceberg Lake, and Hidden Lake Overlook.

Which side of Glacier National Park is better?

The east side of Glacier National Park is better for hiking. This is where you’ll find most of the park’s popular trails, including the Highline Trail, St. Mary & Virginia Falls, Hidden Lake Overlook, and all the trails in the Many Glacier region.

How hard is the Highline Trail in Glacier National Park?

The Highline Trail is rated a hard, or difficult. While the elevation gain is moderate, the distance of this trail, 12 miles one way, makes it a strenuous hike that is challenging for even experienced hikers. That said, most visitors can hike the Highline Trail with proper conditioning and training.

How do you prepare for hiking in Glacier National Park?

Prepare for hiking in Glacier National Park by improving your conditioning and fitness, packing plenty of water and staying hydrated, plan out your hike ahead of time, and carrying the 10 hiking essentials.

Is it safe to hike alone in Glacier National Park?

While it’s generally not safe to hike alone in bear country, you will be safe hiking solo on Glacier National Park’s most popular hiking trails as there will be plenty of people around during the day. If you are concerned about hiking alone, consider tagging along with another group setting out from the trailhead.

What do I need to know before going to Glacier National Park?

Glacier National Park requires an entry fee to enter the park and accepts the America the Beautiful National Park Pass. Going-to-the-Sun Road is only open from June to September in some parts. Be sure to check trail and road conditions when planning your trip.

Final Thoughts on the Best Glacier National Park Day Hikes

Glacier National Park has so much to offer and by far the easiest way to see it all is by hiking. This list of the best hikes in Glacier National Park covers all the sights, from easy to hard trails.

Here’s a quick recap of the best hikes in Glacier National Park:

  1. Baring Falls
  2. Grinnell Lake
  3. Redrock Falls
  4. McDonald Creek
  5. Trail of the Cedars
  6. Avalanche Lake
  7. Highline Trail
  8. Hidden Lake Overlook
  9. Grinnell Glacier Overlook (The Garden Wall)
  10. Siyeh Pass
  11. St. Mary and Virginia Falls
  12. Apikuni Falls
  13. Cracker Lake
  14. Grinnell Glacier
  15. Iceberg Lake
  16. Ptarmigan Lake & Tunnel
  17. Swiftcurrent Pass
  18. Pitamakan-Dawson Loop
  19. Paradise Point

Ready to plan your trip to Glacier National Park? Don’t miss these posts!

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2 thoughts on “19 Best Hikes in Glacier National Park You Need to Explore”

  1. Thank you very much for your wonderful resources about Glacier! We are planning our first trip in August, staying 3 nights in Whitefish. If we were to watch the sunset at Wild Goose Overlook can we still drive back west after dark to get to our lodging? Is driving on the GTSR after dark reasonable?

    1. Hi Brook – you can definitely drive back across GTSR after dark, but you’ll want to drive very cautiously as it’s dark and windy through the Logan Pass area. It will take longer, but it doable. Another option is taking Highway 2 instead.

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